Is Beef Wellington Melbourne a Must Eat This Winter?

Those who thought they ate their last beef in Wellington in 1973 may have a food shock this winter. A strip of beef pastry is being served at gourmet pubs and neighborhood restaurants around Melbourne, with top butchers selling ready-to-bake versions.

The appeal is undeniable for Troy Wheeler, who sells the main item through the four Metsmith butcher shops he shares. “Astringent, full, delicious pastry; a beautiful piece of blindfold that is soft and supple; full, nonsensical dixels around the blindfold. It’s so great on the dining table.”

It’s a complex piece of kitchen handwork, which is why people like to outsource it. And after two highlights Master chef In just two episodes, Show Stopper has received a lot of Melbourne aflators.

It takes three days to make leisurely beef in Wellington. Photo: Parker Blaine

Made with premium cut beef and golden pastry shell, another essential ingredient of Beef Wellington is finely chopped mushrooms, which are cooked into a paste with shallows, butter and herbs, called dextrose. Often the meat is spread with pâté, then wrapped in duxelles and rolled into a pastry, usually puff.

It is thought to have been named after the first Duke of Wellington, who tried a similar French dish (Buff an Crot) during the Napoleonic Wars in the early 1800’s.

Classically French-trained chef Donovan Cooke serves beef wellington at his Fitzroy North restaurant Ryne as a pre-order special ($ 60). This is one of the few old-school recipes he learned at a London restaurant like Waterside Inn Bray.

Most of us remember our parents’ dinner party, where they ate beef and drank port in Wellington.


Troy Wheeler

Cook’s first beef making in Wellington was in 1992 to marry the famous chef Marco Pierre White to Lisa Butcher. “McLean’s all-star chef in London was there. And Marco wanted it in Breivich, not in the pastry,” he laughs.

Steven Nelson of The Recreation in Fitzroy North says that the kitchen atmosphere gets charged during the preparation of Wellington. “Everyone is waiting for this first piece. The whole brigade [of chefs] Collected around the cupping board. “

This dish is a three day preparation for his team. Since its inclusion in the Sunday menu in early June, demand has been good, with 40 shares sold at $ 60 per pop last week.

Variations in the original composition are common. In Meatsmith, there is no pâté but crepe is added as a layer between mushrooms and short crust pastry, which helps absorb any kind of moisture during cooking.

The Coke version lays a layer of Jimon Iberico (treated Spanish ham) between the puff pastry and the dextrose. In approval of the French version, it also combined its dexels with fui grass and chicken lever parafite.

Tips for making your own Wellington at home

Since this difficult first brush with Wellington Preparation, Cook has mastered it and here are a few tips for those who want to try it at home.

Rhine's Beef Wellington includes luxury touches such as Fui Grass, Chicken Liver Parfight and Jimon Iberico.

Rhine’s Beef Wellington includes luxury touches such as Fui Grass, Chicken Liver Parfight and Jimon Iberico. Photo: Van Taylor

“It’s all about preparation. Don’t try to eat beef in Wellington the day you want to eat it. If you want an easy life, I suggest you start two days earlier,” he says. ۔

Wrap your beef in cling film and refrigerate for at least a day after spreading with its various additions. It will help to organize everything and keep its shape.

But don’t forget to open the plastic before adding the pastry. Cook says this has happened before – even in professional kitchens. The meat thermometer is necessary to check that it is cooked, but before you cut it with a sharp knife, let Wellington rest.

When making Beef Wellington at home, it is important to rest the meat thermometer and the parcel after baking.

When making Beef Wellington at home, it is important to rest the meat thermometer and the parcel after baking. Photo: Parker Blaine

Or you could order a pre-assembled retro classic from butchers like Peter Bouchier or Metsmith, of which chef Andrew McConnell is a partner.

Wheeler says Matt Smith has offered a variety of pre-assembled beef and pastry creations since opening in 2015. But Wellington’s sales have increased over the past year.

Wheeler believes that appeal is a combination of convenience and nostalgia. “Most of us remember our parents’ dinner party, where they ate beef and drank port in Wellington; it reminds me of a cold, cold night around the fire.”

Matsmith's beef is cooked in the Wellington oven and sold ready to serve to guests at dinner.

Matt Smith’s beef is cooked in the Wellington oven and sold ready to serve to guests at dinner. Photo: Jana Langhorst

Wheeler likes to serve it with red wine juice and green salad or roasted carrots and parsnips. Nelson is also a fan of red wine, but adds mashed potatoes.

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